Welcome to Armenia

Museums

 

Republic Square, Yerevan (+374-10) 58-27-61, 52-14-57 
The State History Museum in Republic Square (formerly Lenin Square) is notable for the statues of Catherine the Great and Lenin squirreled away in a back courtyard ready for any change in the political winds. The important archaeological collection from Stone Age through Medieval periods is dark and almost unlabeled, but should not be missed. Note a Latin inscription from Ejmiatsin attesting to the presence of a Roman garrison. There are some interesting models of early modern Yerevan and other historical exhibits of interest to those comfortable in Armenian or Russian. [Source: RDA] 

National History Museum (Yerevan)

The State History Museum in Republic Square (formerly Lenin Square) is notable for the statues of Catherine the Great and Lenin squirreled away in a back courtyard ready for any change in the political winds. The important archaeological collection from Stone Age through Medieval periods is dark and almost unlabeled, but should not be missed. Note a Latin inscription from Ejmiatsin attesting to the presence of a Roman garrison. There are some interesting models of early modern Yerevan and other historical exhibits of interest to those comfortable in Armenian or Russian.

 


 

 

Museum of Armenian manuscripts (Yerevan)

According to Unesco, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Matenadaran Museum, is "the oldest and richest a library in the world". Its collection includes over 17,000 Armenian manuscripts dating back to medieval manuscripts, 3,000 in foreign languages and some 100,000 other ancient documents.

 

 


 

 


Erebuni Fortress Museum (Yerevan)

The Urartian kingdom, centered on Lake Van in Eastern Turkey, gave Yerevan its first major impetus. The Urartians built the citadel of Erebuni. A substantial museum at the base of the hill formerly known as Arin Berd houses many of the finds, including a few examples of Urartu's splendid metalwork. 

 


 

 

 

Armenian Craft Museum (Yerevan)

Before leaving Abovian Street, drop into the Armenian Craft Museum (No. 64), with its unique examples of silver and German silver jewellery, woodwork, carpets, earthenware and embossed goods. Armenia today has many skilled craftsmen, who continue and develop the traditional folk crafts, and their products have been successfully displayed in many Soviet cities, France, the USA, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Argentina, Japan, Algeria and Nigeria. The museum is open from 11:00 to 16:00 every day except Monday. Entrance is free.

 


 

Parajanov Museum (Yerevan)

The best museum in Yerevan which is small and idiosyncratic, the final home of famed Soviet filmmaker Sergei Parajanov (1924-1990). Though an ethnic Armenian (Parajanian), he was born in Tbilisi and spent most of his professional career in Kiev and Tbilisi. He won international fame with "Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors" and "The Color of Pomegranates," but his career was crippled by imprisonment (for homosexual liaisons) and denial of resources.

 

 


 

Genocide Museum (Yerevan)

The Genocide Memorial and Museum at Tsitsernakaberd ("Swallow Castle") is an Iron Age fortress, all above-ground trace, which seems to have disappeared. The Museum's testimony to the 1915 destruction of the Armenian communities of Eastern Anatolia is moving, and the monument itself is austere but powerful. The riven spire symbolizes the sundering of the Eastern and Western branches of the Armenian people. The view over the Ararat valley is striking.

 


 

National Gallery of Armenia (Yerevan)

The floors above the National History Museum contain the National Picture Gallery. Start by taking the elevator to the top, then descend through the huge collection of Russian, Armenian and European works.